James Sellars monument

M011 James Sellars monument

Address: Lambhill Cemetery, Balmore Road, Glasgow G23 5LB
Date: 1889
Authorship: Authorship category 4 (Office) (Office)

Colour photograph of monument to James Sellars

James Sellars, the noted Glasgow architect who designed the 1888 Glasgow International Exhibition buildings, St Andrew's Halls (today the rear of the Mitchell Library) and the Victoria Infirmary, died aged 45 on 9 October 1888. John Keppie had served his apprenticeship and worked as an assistant at Sellars's firm, Campbell Douglas & Sellars, and was invited to design a commemorative monument to be located in Lambhill Cemetery in the N. of Glasgow, which was paid for by subscription by Sellars's friends and colleagues. Sellars designed a triumphal-arch entrance gate for the cemetery in 1880 and the monument was placed directly in line with it, at the opposite end of the main drive. 1 Sellars' wife, Jane Moodie, who died in Jersey in 1927, is also commemorated on the monument.

Keppie designed a Greek-style aedicule monument, which was executed in red and grey granite, with a central bronze memorial panel and Egyptian details at the pediment and flanking pilasters. 2

The job-book entry records only contractor tenders, but it is believed the granite work was carried out by Edward Good and the bronze by James Pittendrigh Macgillivray. 3

Authorship: A drawing of the monument was published under John Keppie's name in the British Architect. 4

Status: Standing monument; bronze panel missing (2014)

Grid Reference: NS 5787 7005

GPS coordinates: lat = 55.903613, lng = -4.273946   (Map)

Notes:

1: Glasgow Herald, 10 October 1888, p. 1; 17 October 1888, p. 9; 'James Sellars', Dictionary of Scottish Architects, 1840–1980, www.scottisharchitects.org.uk [accessed 8 March 2013]; British Architect, 31, 8 February 1889, pp. 105; 114; Elizabeth Williamson, Anne Riches and Malcolm Higgs, Buildings of Scotland: Glasgow, London: Penguin, 1990, p. 415.

2: British Architect, 31, 8 February 1889, pp. 105; 114; Elizabeth Williamson, Anne Riches and Malcolm Higgs, Buildings of Scotland: Glasgow, London: Penguin, 1990, p. 415.

3: Ray McKenzie, Public Sculpture of Glasgow Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2000, pp. 485; 490.

4: British Architect, 31, 8 February 1889, pp. 105; 114.