E. S. Lawrie & Co.

Slaters

E. Lawrie, 'slater and plasterer, 21 North St Mungo Street', Glasgow, was a direct continuation of 'Andrew Lawrie, slater', the title until 1886. 1 The firm was known as 'E. S. Lawrie & Co.' from 1905, but never appears as 'E. Lawrie & Son'. 2

Andrew Lawrie (c. 1832– after 1891) migrated from rural Langton, Berwickshire, opened his business around 1858, and had three employees by 1861. 3 He was listed at North St Mungo Street in crowded industrial Townhead, in 1870, and the firm remained at this address for the next century. 4 Lawrie (as a 'master builder employing 35 men'), built two blocks of tenements facing his works yard in 1870, but in 1885, faced serious economic problems. 5 He was declared bankrupt, and retired to the countryside near Moodiesburn, Lanarkshire. 6

Andrew's eldest son was a carpenter, but it was the younger, Ephraim Smith Lawrie (c. 1863–1925), who took over the slater's business from his father in 1886–7. 7 E. S. Lawrie both worked and lived in St Mungo Street with his family, moving to 317 Onslow Drive, Dennstoun in the 1900s. 8 The firm had a quiet existence, until in 1904, like his father, Lawrie suffered financial difficulties. 9 His property was sequestrated, but he appears to have paid off his creditors over five years, and remained in business. 10 He reorganised his business as 'E. S. Lawrie & Co.' around 1905, and it retained this style thereafter. 11

From the late 1890s, Lawrie was an active Mason with 'the Lodge of Glasgow, St John 3 bis', even writing its history, which was published posthumously in 1927. 12 He was also a Free Churchman, and delegate to their General Assembly in 1916. 13 That same year, his youngest son won a Free Church bursary at Glasgow University, just two months after another son, 2nd Lt James Hunter Lawrie, was killed. 14 The company moved from Townhead during urban redevelopment in 1970–1, and was still trading in the 1980s. 15

Notes:

1: Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1885–6, p. 359; 1886–7, p. 359; 1887–8, p. 357.

2: Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1905–6, p. 419.

3: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2013]; Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1858–9, p. 150.

4: Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1870–1, p. 210.

5: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2013]; Glasgow Herald, 9 December 1870, p. 6; London Gazette, 29 September 1885, p. 4576; Dundee Courier, 30 September 1885, p. 6.

6: Glasgow Herald, 19 March 1887, p. 8; Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2013].

7: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk; death date, www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk [both accessed 25 June 2013]; Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1886–7, p. 359; 1887–8, p. 357.

8: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2013]; Glasgow Post Office directories, 1855–1941.

9: Edinburgh Gazette, 29 July 1904, p. 819; 11 April 1905, p. 390.

10: Edinburgh Gazette, 14 July 1908, p. 796; 26 October 1909, p. 1126; 4 December 1914, p. 1478; Glasgow Post Office directories, 1855–1941.

11: Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1905–6, p. 419.

12: Glasgow Herald, 13 January 1897, p. 10; Ephraim S. Lawrie, The Lodge of Glasgow 'St. John' with Notes ... , Glasgow: Aird & Coghill, 1927.

13: Scotsman, 5 April 1916, p. 5.

14: Scotsman, 15 August 1916, p. 7; 4 October 1916, p. 9.

15: 'Telephone Directory Glasgow October 1970', p. 405; 'Glasgow October 1971', p. 431; 'Glasgow 1980', p. 518, British Phone Books 1880–1984, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2013].