Dr John Macintyre

Client

John Macintyre (1857–1928) was a distinguished Glasgow physician and surgeon. His father was a Gaelic-speaking tailor from Fort William who had migrated to Glasgow. 1 John trained initially as an electrician before studying medicine at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1882. After pursuring further study in London, Paris and Vienna, and working as a ship's surgeon, he returned to Glasgow to become a throat surgeon at Anderson's College Dispensary, and to study the potentially therapeutic applications of electricity. 2 By 1891 he was living with his two unmarried sisters, and working as Assistant Surgeon and Consulting Medical Electrician at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. He resigned from this position in 1892. 3 He subsequently ran his own practice from his home at 179 Bath Street, specialising in problems of voice production for performers, and lecturing to school teachers on effective classroom speaking. 4

Macintyre contributed regularly to scientific and medical journals. In 1896 he wrote to Nature about his pioneering experiments with X-ray photography and delivered a seminal paper on 'Roentgen X-Rays, or the new photography', the same year. 5 He set up what has been described as 'the world's first radiology unit' at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, using the photographs to aid diagnosis. He became the joint editor of the British Journal of Laryngology, Rhinology, and Otology, and at various times was a president of the Roentgen Society, of the West of Scotland Branch of the British Medical Association, and of the British Laryngological Association (twice). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, was a member of the Institute of Electrical Engineers and of Glasgow Art Club. 6 Links with Glasgow's artistic and theatrical scene led to his involvement with bodies such the Artists' Benevolent Association, and in 1896 he organised its costume ball alongside painters such as William MacTaggart and John Lavery. 7 The sale of Macintyre's estate in 1929 included X-ray apparatus, electro-static machines and transformers, as well as 'valuable pictures, books, curios and instruments', and a 'boudoir grand pianoforte by Bechstein'. 8

Notes:

1: Census information, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2012].

2: John Macintyre biography, Glasgow University Archive Services, 2006–8, www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography [accessed 23 June 2012].

3: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 25 June 2012].

4: John Macintyre biography, Glasgow University Archive Services, 2006–8, www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography [accessed 23 June 2012]; Glasgow Post Office Directories 1888–1910; Glasgow Herald, 17 April 1893, p. 6.

5: Aberdeen Weekly Journal, 25 February 1896, p. 7; John Macintyre biography, Glasgow University Archive Services, 2006–8, www.worldchanging.glasgow.ac.uk/notable-people [accessed 23 June 2012].

6: John Macintyre biography, Glasgow University Archive Services, 2006–8, www.worldchanging.glasgow.ac.uk/notable-people [accessed 23 June 2012].; George Eyre-Todd, 'John MacIntyre', Who's Who in Glasgow in 1909, Glasgow: Gowans & Gray, 1909, [Transcript Unpaginated], Glasgow Digital Library, http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/eyrwho/, [accessed 25 June 2014].

7: Scotsman, 17 August 1896, p. 1.

8: Scotsman, 18 May 1929, p. 22.