Lady Maxwell

Donor

Jane, Lady Maxwell of Calderwood (also known as the Dowager Lady Maxwell of Calderwood, c. 1853–1942) was the widow of Sir William Maxwell (1828–1885), the 10th Baronet of Calderwood. 1 Originally Jane Baird, she was the duaghter of Frank Baird (c. 1815–1885), a partner in the prosperous brewers and maltsters Hugh Baird & Co., 'Brewers to Her Majesty', of the Great Canal Brewery, Glasgow. 2 Jane and her sisters were educated at home, which included Gairbraid House, Maryhill, and then Belhaven Terrace, Glasgow. 3

In 1880, Jane married advantageously the much older Sir William Maxwell, hereditary proprietor of Calderwood Castle and much of East Kilbride parish. 4 As Lady Maxwell, she was chatelaine of 'eight farms ... the romantic [Calder] glen and 1,125 acres'. 5 The couple remained childless and thus on Sir William's death in 1885, the baronetcy passed to cousins.

Two years later, Jane married George Leader Owen of Withybush (1838–1905), a Welsh lawyer, biblical scholar and sometime Deputy Lieutenant and High Sheriff of Pembrokeshire. 6 Although his brothers included a priest, a judge and a distinguished historian, Owen himself was reported to have languished as 'a man of great undeveloped ability'. 7

Jane continued to use her former style, despite remarrying, as there were no other Lady Maxwells; her successors held alternative titles. 8 Like other contemporary Scottish gentry, she over-wintered in Biarritz and Nice until 1914, patronised charity balls and fundraising fetes, and sat on the Colonial Imperial Club's social committee. 9 In complete contrast, the Calderwood estate had been sold to the Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society for (unprofitable) commercial fruit-growing in 1904. 10

Notes:

1: C. Mosley, ed., Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 1, Stokesley: Burke's Peerage & Gentry, 2003, p. 1391; 'Widow of a Baronet', Debrett's: Forms of Address: Titles, www.debretts.com [accessed 5 April 2013].

2: Glasgow Post Office Directory, 1860–1, p. 58; Edinburgh Gazette, 21 March 1848, p. 145; 21 February 1860, p. 296; Glasgow University Archives Service: N. Milne and W. Redlich, 'Records of Hugh Baird & Sons Administrative History', 2001, UGD 109/6, www.archives.gla.ac.uk [accessed 27 March 2013].

3: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 28 March 2013]; Glasgow Post Office Directory , 1870–1, p. 63; 1880–1, p. 96.

4: Glasgow Herald, 30 January 1857, p. 7; 21 April 1880, p. 1; 'Councillor Henry Murphy, J.P., and Calderwood Castle', Glasgow and Lanarkshire Illustrated, Hamilton: Hamilton Herald, 1904, p. 40.

5: J. A. Flanagan, Wholesale Co-operation in Scotland, Glasgow: S.C.W.S., 1920, p. 181.

6: Scotsman, 9 May 1887, p. 12; Monumental Inscriptions at Rudbaxton, pdf file, Carmarthenshire Family History Society, 2000, p. 1, www.carmarthenshirefhs.info/rudbaxmis.pdf [accessed 5 April 2013]; G. L. Owen, Notes on ... our early English Bible, London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1901, title page.

7: Vincent Evans, 'Henry Owen of Poyston', Welsh Outlook, 7, no. 5, May 1920, pp. 121–3; J. Brown, J. W. Phillips and F. J. Warren, History of Haverfordwest, Haverfordwest: L. Brigstocke, 1914, p. 165; B. G. Charles, 'Owen, Henry, (1844–1919)', Welsh Biography Online, National Library of Wales, www.wbo.llgc.org.uk [accessed 26 March 2013].

8: Census data, www.ancestry.co.uk [accessed 3 April 2013]; J. Brown, J. W. Phillips and F. J. Warren, History of Haverfordwest, Haverfordwest: L. Brigstocke, 1914, p. 11.

9: The Times, 22 February 1888, p. 3; 6 November 1908, p. 13; 10 November 1908, p. 13; 4 July 1910, p. 9; 12 February 1914, p. 11.

10: J. A. Flanagan, Wholesale Co-operation in Scotland, Glasgow: S.C.W.S., 1920, p. 180–2; S.C.W.S Advertising Dept, Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society ... Historical ... Handbook, Glasgow: S.C.W.S., pp. 19, 119.